Tuesday, November 17, 2020

THE LATEST ON US-CHINA RELATIONS

Director of Asian studies at the American Enterprise Institute DAN BLUMENTHAL is our guest.

WEBSITE: https://www.aei.org 

He talks about his latest work: 

THE CHINA NIGHTMARE: THE GRAND AMBITIONS OF A DECAYING STATE, by Dan Blumenthal  (Author)

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (November 17, 2020)

This is a book about China’s grand strategy and its future as an ambitious, declining, and dangerous rival power. Once the darling of U.S. statesmen, corporate elites, and academics, the People’s Republic of China has evolved into America’s most challenging strategic competitor. Its future appears increasingly dystopian. This book tells the story of how China got to this place and analyzes where it will go next and what that will mean for the future of U.S. strategy. The China Nightmare makes an extraordinarily compelling case that China’s future could be dark and the free world must prepare accordingly.

DAN BLUMENTHAL is the director of Asian studies at the American Enterprise Institute, where he focuses on East Asian security issues and Sino-American relations. Mr. Blumenthal has both served in and advised the US government on China issues for over a decade. From 2001 to 2004, he served as senior director for China, Taiwan, and Mongolia at the Department of Defense. Additionally, he served as a commissioner on the congressionally-mandated US-China Economic and Security Review Commission since 2006-2012, and held the position of vice chairman in 2007. He has also served on the Academic Advisory Board of the congressional US-China Working Group. Mr. Blumenthal is the co-author of An Awkward Embrace: The United States and China in the 21st Century (2012).

WAR: HOW CONFLICT SHAPED US, by Margaret MacMillan  (Author)

Publisher: Random House (October 6, 2020)

The instinct to fight may be innate in human nature, but war—organized violence—comes with organized society. War has shaped humanity’s history, its social and political institutions, its values and ideas. Our very language, our public spaces, our private memories, and some of our greatest cultural treasures reflect the glory and the misery of war. War is an uncomfortable and challenging subject not least because it brings out both the vilest and the noblest aspects of humanity. Margaret MacMillan looks at the ways in which war has influenced human society and how, in turn, changes in political organization, technology, or ideologies have affected how and why we fight. War: How Conflict Shaped Us explores such much-debated and controversial questions as: When did war first start? Does human nature doom us to fight one another? Why has war been described as the most organized of all human activities? Why are warriors almost always men? Is war ever within our control? Drawing on lessons from wars throughout the past, from classical history to the present day, MacMillan reveals the many faces of war—the way it has determined our past, our future, our views of the world, and our very conception of ourselves.

MARGARET MACMILLAN is emeritus professor of international history at the University of Oxford and professor of history at the University of Toronto.

WEBSITE: http://www.margaretmacmillan.com

She received her PhD from Oxford University and became a member of the history faculty at Ryerson University in 1975.  In 2002 she became Provost of Trinity College at the University of Toronto, and from 2007 to 2017 she was the Warden of St. Antony’s College at Oxford University. Her books include Women of the Raj (1988, 2007); Paris 1919: Six Months that Changed the World (2001) (Peacemakers in the UK) for which she was the first woman to win the Samuel Johnson Prize; Nixon in China: Six Days that Changed the World (Seize the Hour: When Nixon Met Mao in the UK); The Uses and Abuses of History (2008); Extraordinary Canadians: Stephen Leacock (2009); The War that Ended Peace (2014). Her most recent book is History’s People (2015).